Scorpion deaths in Egypt after attack in sand

Image copyright EPA Image caption One woman took the scorpions to her cousin’s home near the airport in a plastic bag, Egyptian media reported Three people have died and several more injured in a…

Scorpion deaths in Egypt after attack in sand

Image copyright EPA Image caption One woman took the scorpions to her cousin’s home near the airport in a plastic bag, Egyptian media reported

Three people have died and several more injured in a scorpion attack in Egypt, local media and state TV reported.

Scorpions were released from a hole in the ground into the sand surrounding the house, where they were found by a family.

Men sought medical treatment, as then were 20 other family members.

The Egyptian newspaper Al-Masry Al-Youm said it was not known whether the insects were poisonous.

“We were confused and scared because we thought they could sting us,” said one of the injured, Amir M.

“I took them out on [one] of the women but she said she didn’t have any [repellents] with her so I put them into a plastic bag that I’d opened,” he added.

Image copyright EPA Image caption The Egyptian government has spent much of its decade in power eradicating the scorpion

Moby mentioned that when the scorpions started to sting them, one woman took them home with her, passing off the bag as a toy.

The scorpions were still alive in the bag when he saw it later, he said.

Health Minister Khaled Shafik has ordered police to launch an investigation.

Image copyright EPA Image caption The family are said to have received treatment in a medical facility

The incident occurred in Qena province near the Mediterranean coast.

Egypt’s New Year’s Day 2017 scorpion infestation saw the family of six become the 10th known victims of scorpion attacks.

That time, all of the victims were foreign tourists at a desert game reserve near El-Badliu town.

In February, an attack killed a man and injured his wife in Ain Sokhna in southern Egypt.

Scorpions are not poisonous but are noted to sting without warning, according to the Encyclopedia Britannica.

They often associate the coils of their elongated venom gland with other body parts including their abdomens, as well as noses and eyes.

Leave a Comment