Nigeria’s El Nino floods blamed on global warming and soil erosion

Global warming and soil erosion are to blame for the devastating levels of erosion the country has experienced in recent years, it has been reported. The El Nino-induced floods in 2017 and the subsequent…

Nigeria's El Nino floods blamed on global warming and soil erosion

Global warming and soil erosion are to blame for the devastating levels of erosion the country has experienced in recent years, it has been reported.

The El Nino-induced floods in 2017 and the subsequent bush fires on top of fresh soil from the river Niger in 2018 have caused considerable damage.

“I saw my house just washed away in one day. I’ve never seen it like that before,” Doron Abam, a local farmer told the BBC. “I lost everything, including my chickens and goats.”

The UN climate chief, Patricia Espinosa, expressed her fears in a recent trip to Nigeria. “Ecological disaster or social disaster?” she asked a news conference. “Many lives, houses, schools are under threat, but I’m here to tell Nigeria that no, this is not a problem that can be ignored – that it is one of the biggest, if not the biggest, challenges to sustainable development in the coming decades.”

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Nigeria’s government is struggling to deal with a growing problem with rampant deforestation, and the loss of soil to erosion, experts said.

“There is alarming loss of soil resources, and a high level of erosion and build-up of silt and water from the Niger valley that has overwhelmed the inhabitants in the area,” Mihaela Szilagyi, of the Nigerian Oceanography Centre, told Associated Press.

China’s Great Wall was built to guard against the ravages of erosion, while the Wall of Spain was built to protect large areas of land from being denuded. But the Central Bank of Nigeria reported that more than 7m hectares (17m acres) of land – an area nearly as large as Belgium – has been lost between 1990 and 2015 due to agricultural, agricultural and forestry activities.

Many residents in Nigeria see erosion as a natural disaster, not a man-made problem.

The UN climate chief warned of a rise in climate-related natural disasters like floods and storms, and said future climate change would affect agriculture, water resources and water security. “Each year [in the] developed countries, there are about 10,000 weather-related disasters that have an impact on approximately a million lives, but when it comes to the developing countries, that number is often more than five times bigger,” she said.

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