Good Samaritans stopped their cars to help thwart suicide bomber attack in Manchester

Several random Good Samaritans stopped their cars to help ferry victims from Manchester Arena to a nearby hospital early on May 22 — instantly saving some lives. The members of the public driving past…

Good Samaritans stopped their cars to help thwart suicide bomber attack in Manchester

Several random Good Samaritans stopped their cars to help ferry victims from Manchester Arena to a nearby hospital early on May 22 — instantly saving some lives.

The members of the public driving past panicked fans at the scene where 22 people were killed and nearly 60 injured, many of them children, moved quickly to ensure as many people as possible got away from the scene in west Manchester, England.

One good Samaritan was Muslim man Shahid Nazir, who told Sky News that he and his friends were driving past the arena when they saw people running for their lives. They stopped their car to help, as did three more people who were in their cars. Nazir said that he helped a woman give birth while in the car with her and managed to perform CPR on a three-year-old baby.

Another person who stopped to help was Jeanette Asher, a nurse who told Sky News that she was “standing shoulder to shoulder” with her 22-year-old sister Lisa after she was seriously injured by shrapnel from the bomb.

“A doctor came up to me and gave me this big hug and told me she was safe. It was such a feeling of ‘it’s going to be OK, it’s going to be OK,’” Asher said. “I thought I’d lost my sister … But he said she’s in a critical condition but we’ll get through it.”

The volunteer “heroes” that helped in the aftermath of the deadly bombing have been praised by Liverpool residents and soccer fans around the world.

Hundreds of residents gathered outside a mosque in Liverpool to show support for the victims of the bombing.

Tony Ball is a well-known local football fanatic from Liverpool. He told FoxNews.com that there are a lot of good people in the city and they should show support for everyone involved in the tragedy, including the terrorists.

“There are plenty of good people here. We’re all scarred by this attack, just as the people who carried it out,” he said. “It’s awful, it’s terrible — people I wouldn’t want to meet, people I wouldn’t want to be involved with, but that won’t bring anybody to this level.”

In scenes reminiscent of the attacks in Paris last year, citizens in Saint-Denis took matters into their own hands and risked their own lives in a desperate search for loved ones. Families wandered on rooftops, looking for signs of life among the collapsed building.

Some pushed frantically through the building while others, like Anas, stepped onto a ledge and tried to reach some of the missing.

“It’s impossible not to get emotional,” he said. “But you can’t give up.”

Police began releasing some names of the victims late Monday. They included best friends Kelly Brewster and Charlotte Campbell, who took their young daughter Olivia to the concert; and 15-year-old Georgina Callander, who had been a big fan of pop star Ariana Grande.

The Islamic State militant group took responsibility for the attack and said the bomber was a “soldier of the Islamic State.” However, British Prime Minister Theresa May said that “at this early stage” the attack was not being treated as a terror attack on grounds of Islamic extremism.

May announced a vote on Sunday on a new anti-terror bill. She said it will bring together 12 counter-terrorism powers that are now kept separately for each agency in the intelligence services, police and security services.

The plan also includes giving police, intelligence agencies and courts greater ability to hold suspects for longer without charge, expand “controlled flight” orders to limit suspects’ movements, and change powers of arrest and detention so suspects can be detained for up to 14 days.

She also said the government would soon begin collecting details of all visitors to the U.K. who have spent more than seven days in the country after listing all those who visited Europe in March alone, including those attending the soccer game in Paris.

In an interview with The Guardian, London Mayor Sadiq Khan slammed the politicians’ divisive rhetoric since the attack.

Khan accused the U.K. government of becoming too confident in itself and refusing to take in more refugees from Iraq and Syria. He asked Britain’s “fine breed of politicians” to reconsider and to “feel the outrage of people dying on our streets and in our city.”

FoxNews.com’s Cristina Corbin and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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