Ace Chinese tennis player Peng Shuai’s doping case has ended

The International Olympic Committee said on Tuesday that it had spoken with Peng Shuai, the Chinese tennis star at the center of a doping investigation by the Chinese Anti-Doping Agency, and the WADA’s anti-doping…

Ace Chinese tennis player Peng Shuai’s doping case has ended

The International Olympic Committee said on Tuesday that it had spoken with Peng Shuai, the Chinese tennis star at the center of a doping investigation by the Chinese Anti-Doping Agency, and the WADA’s anti-doping program determined the athlete was “not in breach of anti-doping rules.”

On Monday, Peng was widely criticized in China for not attending the ATP Finals in London, where she was defending her title, and instead flying home to Beijing. She said she needed to spend time with her family in China.

Olympic officials on Tuesday confirmed their contact with Peng but offered no details about the conversation. Peng is also a member of the Chinese swim team. An IOC spokesman said that no individual IOC member had spoken to Peng.

Peng was first suspended in April and then was provisionally suspended as of Nov. 1. She had a B sample returned to Chinese officials by WADA and the result was reclassified from an out-of-competition A sample. WADA never released a copy of the B sample.

The Chinese Anti-Doping Agency, which serves athletes ranging from national Olympic teams to individual competitors, said it had extended the ban on Peng from a provisional suspension to a one-year suspension pending a final hearing. Peng had appealed the initial ban but had not submitted her case to the WADA. She was not present at the hearing.

In her first statement after the ban was extended, Peng told The Associated Press that she had taken medication to fight the common cold, which affected her metabolism. She said the pill caused her body to produce the substance clenbuterol.

Clenbuterol is used by soccer players and farm workers to help speed up the removal of fat and is a substance that WADA banned in the early 1980s, as long as athletes took it orally, which is where Peng’s accident occurred. The substance, like many sports doping substances, is banned by WADA.

The International Tennis Federation said in a statement on Monday that Peng had not fully cooperated with the agency in its investigation.

“On 23 October, the ITF was made aware of a doping violation being levied against Ms. Peng Shuai in connection with a sample collection that took place on 14 September in New York City,” the ITF said. “She was provisionally suspended on 14 October and the hearing was convened for 3 November. She subsequently refused to attend the hearing, at the request of WADA, in order to complete her examination and subsequently cancelled her visa to travel to WADA headquarters in Montreal, Canada, so that her examination could be conducted in Beijing.

“Following further discussions between WADA and the ITF, Ms. Peng was informed that the International Tennis Federation had supported WADA’s request for a final hearing in Beijing. Following that request, on 24 November, WADA decided that it did not intend to continue with the case, as Ms. Peng had not sufficiently cooperated in its investigation and therefore not been adjudicated.”

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